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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
OVERVIEW

PLEASE NOTE:

The alpha-numeric course prefix system should be interpreted as follows:

  • The four letters indicate the department or main subject matter of a course. [BIBL (Bible); DISC (Discipleship); COUN/PSYC (Counselling); EDUC (Education); MUSI (Music); RELS (Practics); THEO (Theology), etc.
  • The first numeral indicates the year that the course should be taken [when possible]. 1 = Freshman; 2 = Sophomore; 3 = Junior; 4 = Senior.
  • The second numeral indicates the department [usually]. 1 = Bible; 2 = Theology ; 3 = Practics; 4 = Education, Counselling, Psychology; 5 = Music.
  • The third numeral may indicate the preferential sequence of courses taken in a program [some courses have prerequisites].

Courses marked with an asterisk (*) have been approved as university-equivalent courses by the Under-graduate Academic Council of Trinity Western University.

DS - indicates a potential Directed Study course.
F - Fall Semester
S - Spring Semester
Courses without a date are available every year
Q - Quorum: courses offered if enrolment quorum is reached
2017/2019 - indicates when a course is probably offered.
Courses with a date are offered on a rotation basis if enrolment quorum is reached.

1. DISCIPLESHIP (DISC Omega)

DISC 101 Spiritual Formation I [F]  3 sem. hrs.
This course introduces the student to Christian discipleship and Spiritual disciplines. It promotes the formation of a deeper devotional life. It encourages a Christian response and understanding of relationships toward ourselves, God, the Church, and the world.

DISC 102 Pentecostal Distinctives [S]  3 sem. hrs.
The distinctive doctrines and practices of the Pentecostal movement are presented in the light of Biblical teaching on the Holy Spirit. The beliefs, theology, and practices of Pentecostalism are examined and applied.

DISC 104 Team Ministry [S]  3 sem. hrs.
A practical preparation course for the short term missionary experience in May. An emphasis on information regarding the destination, culture, language, keys to effective team ministry, and practical evangelism training forms much of the course. Teams prepare for ministry opportunities in schools, churches, and foreign local contexts.

DISC 105 Church Ministry I [F]  3 sem. hrs.
This course provides an historical overview of the Church. It also studies the Biblical role and function of the Church in the world. Students will develop their understanding and appreciation of the nature and purpose of the Universal Church and are challenged to reflect on their place within the body of Christ.

DISC 106 Church Ministry II [S]  3 sem. hrs.
A practical study of how the church should operate as a body according to the Scriptures. Students will develop their understanding and appreciation for the part they are called to fulfil within a local church context.

Omega Global students will also take: BIBL 111 Bible Survey, THEO 121 Doctrinal Survey, RELS 133 Religious Conversion, RELS 134 Apologetics , RELS 235 Intercultural Communication

2.1 BIBLICAL LITERATURE (BIBL)

* BIBL 111 Bible Survey [OMEGA] [F]  3 sem. hrs.
This course provides an overview of the background, content, and message of the Bible. It includes brief summaries of the content, structure, and key themes of individual books within their broader Biblical sections. The purpose of the course is to give a broad, introductory understanding and knowledge of the Bible that is foundational to other Biblical courses.

* BIBL 113 Hermeneutics [F]  3 sem. hrs.
Hermeneutics is concerned with the science of interpreting the Scriptures. This course includes a brief history of Biblical interpretation from Bible times to the present and an introduction to various contemporary schools of interpretation. Emphasis is given to the principles of interpretation common to evangelical Protestantism. General principles of interpretation will be applied to the different genres of the Bible including narrative, legal, historical, poetic, prophetic, gospel, and epistolary literature.

* BIBL 114 Pentateuch [S]  3 sem. hrs.
A detailed study of the first five books of the Bible [the Torah or Law of the Hebrew Bible]. These books give the historical, theological, legal, and covenantal foundations for the faith of Israel, and ultimately for the Church.

* BIBL 115 Gospels [F]  3 sem. hrs.
The Synoptic Gospels are studied as foundational New Testament literature in the context of first century Judaism. The Gospel of Matthew receives an in-depth expositional and theological exposition. The structure and themes of Mark, Luke, and John will be surveyed. Course material will feature the life, teaching, ministry, and passion of Jesus.

* BIBL 211 Historical Literature of the Old Testament [F]  3 sem. hrs.
A study of Israel's history from the time of the Conquest (c.1400 BC) to the time of the Restoration (c. 450 BC). This focus on Biblical history includes periods of the Conquest (Joshua), the Settlement (Judges and Ruth), the Monarchy (the books of Samuel, Kings and Chronicles), the Exile and Restoration (Esther, Ezra and Nehemiah).

* BIBL 212 Acts of the Apostles [S]  3 sem. hrs.
An expositional study of the Book of Acts presents the history of the Early Church from Christ's ascension to Paul's arrest and ministry in Rome. "Acts" shows the impressive growth of Christianity in the context of a pluralistic society with various degrees of persecution. The origin and activities of the charismatic community and its leaders are observed. Early church practices of prayer, fellowship, sacraments and evangelism are examined to reveal church planting and missionary strategies. The role of the Holy Spirit is featured to present the programmatic implications for all churches. Ministry roles of key characters in Acts provide instruction for contemporary leadership application. This course provides an important background for the study of the Pauline epistles and the Church of the apostolic fathers.

BIBL 214 Exegetical Methodology [DS]  3 sem. hrs.
This course considers principles for the historical investigation into the meaning of the Biblical text. It works through the principles and methods for careful exegetical work with a focus on the intention of the Biblical authors for the original audience of the Scriptures.

BIBL 250 Biblical Foundations & Contemporary Issues of Worship [F 2017/19]  3 sem. hrs.
This course develops a Biblical theology of worship, with reference to individual and corporate worship. Scriptures are examined to discover the meaning of worship for a personal devotional life as well as worship in a Christian community. Spiritual formation and discipleship are discussed in the context of whole-life worship. Biblical purposes and elements of corporate worship gatherings in light of contemporary culture are discussed. (This course is a prerequisite to MUSI 351 Corporate Worship Leadership and Administration.)

* BIBL 311 Pauline Literature [F 2018/2020]  3 sem. hrs.
A detailed exegetical and theological exposition of Paul's "soteriological" epistles is presented. From Romans and Galatians, Paul's teaching on the plight of man, God's saving provision in Jesus, and the liberty and growth of the Christian through the indwelling of the Spirit are emphasized. Paul's teaching on the Law, works and faith is compared and contrasted with the perspective of the Judaism of New Testament times.

* BIBL 312 Prophetic Literature [DS]  3 sem. hrs.
A historical and thematic study of Isaiah, Jeremiah and Ezekiel. The theological implications of the message of each prophet are explored and the practical lessons found in these books are emphasized.

* BIBL 313 Psalms [S 2018/2020]  3 sem. hrs.
This course is a study into the structure and literary style of the Hebrew Psalter or hymnal. Various genres of Psalms including the Lament, Trust, Didactic, Royal/Messianic, and Praise are analysed. Several Psalms will be exegeted.

* BIBL 314 Wisdom Literature of the Old Testament [F 2018/2020]  3 sem. hrs.
An introduction to the Wisdom literature of the Old Testament: Job, Proverbs, Song of Solomon and Ecclesiastes. The student is led into an understanding and appreciation of the literary style, the basic content, and values of these unique books for application in everyday Christian living.

* BIBL 316 Eschatological Literature - [S 2019/21]  3 sem. hrs.
The doctrine of future events studied in connection with the prophecies of Daniel and Revelation. The content of these books is carefully investigated and topical concerns such as the second coming of Christ, final judgment, millennialism and its variants are given thoughtful attention.

BIBL 317 Corinthians I & II/Philippians [F 2017/2019]  3 sem. hrs.
An exegetical and theological study of Paul's Letters to the Corinthians and Philippians. Problems in the Corinthian church and its troubled relationship with its apostle will be examined in the context of its social, religious, economic and political setting. Implications of Paul's Corinthian correspondence for the mission, ministry and leadership of today's church will be considered.

* BIBL 411 New Testament Backgrounds [DS]  3 sem. hrs.
This course is a survey of the history, culture, institutions and religion of inter-testamental Judaism through the archaeology and literature of the period. It provides essential background material for New Testament documents and theology.

BIBL 412 Non-Pauline Epistles [S 2018/2020]  3 sem. hrs.
A detailed exposition of the Epistle to the Hebrews, James, 1 and 2 Peter, and Jude. Each book is considered for its setting in the world of the New Testament, its Christology, its relationship to the teaching of Jesus and its theological and practical instruction. Where applicable, each book is considered for its controversy with false doctrine and practices which threatened to corrupt apostolic Christianity.

BIBL 413 Minor Prophets [F 2017/2019]  3 sem. hrs.
This course presents the themes and messages of the "minor" prophets that are contained in the "Book of Twelve" of the Hebrew Bible.

BIBL 414 Johannine Literature [DS]  3 sem. hrs.
A detailed exposition of both the Gospel of John and the 3 Johannine Epistles. Emphasis is given to Johannine Christology, the signs and discourses, as well as John's teaching concerning false teachers.

BIBL 415 Biblical Theology of Missions [DS]  3 sem. hrs.
This course explores the Biblical message, themes, methods and mandate as it relates to the subject of "mission." Foundational themes regarding mission are developed in the Old Testament in regards to creation, the nations, and God's mandate for Israel. Covenantal theology and the divine expectation for Israel's blessing of the nations is analysed. The New Testament development of the mission theme and the Christian implementation of Christ's evangelistic commission forms some of the course content. The zeal for mission exhibited by the apostolic church is noted for its methodology and application to our contemporary situation, issues, and challenges.

BIBL 416 Luke [DS]  3 sem. hrs.
A detailed study of the Gospel According to Luke which considers the introductory materials and its unique emphases, as well as a verse-by-verse exegesis of its content.

BIBL 417 Pastoral Epistles [F 2017/2019]  3 sem. hrs.
A careful exposition of the Pastoral Epistles of Paul which include I & II Timothy and Titus. Each book is considered in its context with application to Pastoral concerns in ministry.

2.1 BIBLICAL LANGUAGES

GREE 235, 236 Elementary New Testament Greek [F/S]  3-3 sem. hrs.
A basic introduction to Koine Greek designed to prepare the student for reading the Greek New Testament, including a reading of the Johannine epistles in Greek.

HEBR 245, 246 Elementary Biblical Hebrew & Exegesis [F/S]  3-3 sem. hrs.
An introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of Biblical Hebrew, designed to prepare the student for serious reading and study of the Hebrew Bible.

GREE 331, 332 Readings in the Greek New Testament [Q]  3-3 sem. hrs.
A reading of selected texts from the New Testament, including a study of Greek syntax and an introduction to exegetical methodology. Prerequisites: 235/236 Elementary New Testament Greek.

HEBR 337, 338 Readings in the Hebrew Bible [Q]  3-3 sem. hrs.
A reading of selected texts from the Hebrew Bible, indicating a study of Hebrew syntax and an introduction to exegetical methodology. Prerequisites: 245/246 Elementary Biblical Hebrew and Exegesis.

2.3 SYSTEMATIC AND BIBLICAL THEOLOGY (THEO)

THEO 121 Doctrinal Survey [OMEGA] [S]  3 sem. hrs.
The major doctrines of the Bible are considered in as much detail as possible. A thematic emphasis includes the role of Scripture, the doctrines of God, angels, man, sin, Christ, salvation, the Holy Spirit, the Church, and eternal life.

THEO 221 Doctrine I [F]  3 sem. hrs.
An introduction to the study of systematic theology in the light of Biblical foundations, Christian history, and contemporary discussion. Includes an overview of the theological areas of prolegomena, revelation, and the doctrines of God, man, angels, and sin. This course provides foundational doctrinal teaching for Christian life and ministry application.

THEO 222 Doctrine II [S]  3 sem. hrs.
This course is a continuation of doctrinal study with an emphasis on Christology, Soteriology, Ecclesiology, and Eschatology. The course employs Biblical and Systematic theological approaches to expound key doctrines of the Christian Faith. Recommended Prerequisite: THEO 221.

* THEO 321 Biblical Theology of the Holy Spirit [F]  3 sem. hrs.
This course traces the doctrine of the Holy Spirit through its major Biblical witnesses: the Spirit of God in the Old Testament and the Holy Spirit in the writings of Luke, John and Paul. This methodology leads to the discovery of the unity and diversity within these major witnesses to the soteriological, sanctifying , empowering, and service functions of the Spirit.

* THEO 323 Christology [S 2018/2020]  3 sem. hrs.
An emphasis on the Doctrine of Sin & Christ the Redeemer is made from the traditional circle of themes in Christian dogmatics. The course seeks to uncover the nature, work, and effect of sin, which is often obscured by modern secular ideologies. A Biblical, historical, and theological understanding of the doctrine of the person and work of Jesus Christ is advocated.

* THEO 421 New Testament Theology [S]  3 sem. hrs.
The message and meaning of the New Testament as it is revealed through the discipline of Biblical rather than systematic theology. The history and methodology of New Testament theology are briefly reviewed. The major themes of each New Testament witness are analyzed and recognition is given to both the fundamental unity of New Testament theology and to the diversity of emphasis and expression characteristic of each witness.

* THEO 422 Old Testament Theology [F]  3 sem. hrs.
The message and meaning of the Old Testament as it is revealed through the discipline of Biblical rather than systematic theology. The development and legitimacy of this discipline are examined. Key theological themes of the Old Testament are discussed in the light of the historical context in which they arose. The relationship between the theology of the Old and New Testaments is also investigated.

THEO 424 Research in Theology [DS]  3 sem. hrs.
An independent study of a modern theological problem or issue that influences theology or contemporary schools of thought. Prerequisite: This coursed is limited to students who are in their junior or senior year.

3.1 PASTORAL THEOLOGY (RELS)

Four courses (RELS 131, 132, 133, and 134) are classified as Christianity and Culture courses for the SPC/TWU joint program leading to the B.A. in General Studies degree from Trinity Western University.

BUSI 111 Business Foundations [S]  3 sem. hrs.
This course is an introductory study of business, particularly focusing on planning and budgeting of both personal and church finances, and on the organizing, managing and reporting of (church) business entities. Coverage includes business leadership, especially as applied to leading effective meetings and trouble-shooting various management issues/conflicts, along with a primer (fundamental principles) on how to start a small business. Individual and team assignments will reinforce key lessons taught in class.

* RELS 131 Introduction to Spiritual Issues [F]  3 sem. hrs.
This course explores various aspects in the process of Christian Spiritual Formation. It begins with an overview of the way in which the Holy Spirit works in the lives of individual believers. An overview of the development, unique themes and challenges of Pentecostal Spirituality is provided. An understanding of God's unique gifting in each student's life will be uncovered as the class moves through the themes of spiritual gifts, personality, and the role of an individual's life experience. Topics include spiritual disciplines, discernment, the development of a Christian mind and character, the issue of sin and evil, and hindrances to spiritual growth.

* RELS 134 Apologetics [OMEGA] [F]  3 sem. hrs.
Presents a contemporary and reasonable defence of Christianity in a multi-faith and post-modern world. While emphasis will be placed on building a positive case for Christianity, appropriate negative objections will also be discussed.

RELS 234 Expository Preaching [S]  3 sem. hrs.
Students advance further in understanding and skill in sermon preparation through the critical evaluation of their outlines and preaching under supervision. Lab period required. Youth Communication or equivalent course is a prerequisite for taking Expository Preaching.

RELS 331p Pastoral Theology [S]  3 sem. hrs.
A study of the minister and his work. The pastoral office in general is considered in the areas of call, preparation, and qualification. The pastor's relationship to the church board, educational departments of the church, the District, and the denomination as a whole are each examined from a Biblical, spiritual and practical standpoint.

RELS 332 Christianity and Culture [S]  3 sem. hrs.
A study of the place of Christianity in the secular, multi-cultural, "post-modern" world of North America. This course focuses on how Christians should understand contemporary North American culture. It explores dimensions of this culture that Christians should repudiate, what aspects Christians may be ambivalent about, and what aspects Christians should affirm. This course examines how the entertainment media, fashion industry, sports, and news media, function as the cultural conditioners of our society.

RELS 334 Leadership Development [F]  3 sem. hrs.
In these days marked by rapid and complex societal change and by fresh outpourings of the Holy Spirit, new paradigms of ministry are emerging that recognize that every member of the church is to be a minister. Building on biblical theology as well as secular leadership theory and practice, an integrated approach to developing leaders in the church and in ministry organizations will be considered. Several contemporary models of ministry and leadership development will be discussed and evaluated, with a major emphasis on holistic small groups as a method of developing leaders. Practical methods of identifying, recruiting, training, empowering and evaluating leaders will be explored.

RELS 337 Urban Church Planting and Ministry [S]  3 sem. hrs.
This course focuses on Christian mission and ministry in the world's growing cities, particularly the Greater Vancouver Region, with special attention given to church planting principles and strategies. The biblical basis for urban ministry and church planting is examined as well as case studies of effective urban missional strategies to reach people for Christ. Attention is given to urban issues such as ministry to the poor and homeless, pastoring and raising a family in the city, and reaching rapidly growing ethnic groups. This course includes field trips, lectures by church planters and denominational leaders, personal research into inner city, urban ministry methods as well as a self-directed reading component.

RELS 338 Local Church Leadership and Administration [F]  3 sem. hrs.
A study of church administration and the leadership issues involved in church ministry. Topics include church facilities, building projects, architecture, financing, promotion, meetings and parliamentary law. Students will practice and use the principles of established parliamentary procedure for the chairing of effective meetings. Required for all graduating students seeking ministerial credentials. (Note: for those in the B.R.E. Program, assignments will be geared to their major.)

RELS 335, 336, 435, 436 Pastoral Ministry Internship
1-3 sem. hrs.
An organized program for participation in Christian service activities under the supervision of an experienced pastor in a local assembly. In addition to church activities, students meet for one hour on alternate weeks in a practical work seminar. In both the Fall and Spring semesters interns may achieve 1.5 credits per semester for 10 hours of practical involvement per week. Normally internships are restricted to students in their third or fourth year of studies.

RELS 435, 436e Pastoral Ministry Internship [Evangelism]
1-3 sem. hrs.
An organized program for participating in Christian service in the area of Evangelism. Participants will work under the supervision of an active Evangelist or work with an active outreach organization. The student will comply with the college demands regarding the filing of appropriate reports and the completing of required assignments.

RELS 435, 436s Pastoral Ministry Internship [Summer]
1-3 sem. hrs.
A program for those engaging in suitable summer pastoral activities. It is expected that the program is of at least two month's duration. The student should arrange with the instructor in advance of the season to assure that they qualify for the credit.

3.2 INTERCULTURAL STUDIES (RELS)

* RELS 132 Cross Cultural Studies [S]  3 sem. hrs.
This course is an introduction to the study of missiology and cross-cultural perspectives. Old and New Testament backgrounds for missions are explored in order to understand the importance of culture and God's expectations for his people in regards to "mission." An overview of the rise and development of missions in church history from the apostolic church to the present follows. Practical issues for involvement in missionary work are discussed in the light of contemporary missionary activities and global challenges.

* RELS 133 Religious Conversion in a Multi-faith Society [F]  3 sem. hrs.
This course is an overview of religious conversion from a sociological-religious perspective. It examines religious plurality and relativism in our Canadian context. It compares and contrasts Christian truth claims with those of other religions in order to enable Christians to sensitively and effectively dialogue with people of other faiths. This will involve understanding both Old and New Testament perspectives on other religions. Current cultural trends toward pluralism in Canada and its impact on the process of evangelism in an evangelical context are explored.

RELS 236 Intercultural Communication [S]  3 sem. hrs.
This course is an introduction to matters of intercultural communication. It helps us to identify our own cultural perspectives and facilitates learning about interpersonal relationships with people of other cultures. Various principles and tools for communicating the gospel to people in a different environment from our own familiar culture are considered. Cultural attitudes, values, and ways of life are presented and compared. Important issues like communication skills, culture, reaching people within a different context, diverse ways of thinking and expressing, and variegated behaviour patterns will be discussed.

RELS 434 Global Workers: Principles and Practices [F 2018/2020]  3 sem. hrs.
This course deals with perspectives and matters regarding preparations for the prospective global worker candidate [short term or career] as well as for those who desire to assist in the support and sending of such candidates. Discussion of roles, requirements, ministry, cultural adjustment, travel, health, qualifications, expectations, family, deputation, funding/ finance, spirituality, interpersonal relationships, and nationalization will form much of the content of the course.

RELS 435, 436m Intercultural Ministry Internship
1-3 sem. hrs.
An organized program of Christian service in a cross-cultural setting, under the supervision of an experienced missionary or pastor, in a Canadian or foreign mission context. The program immerses the student in a foreign cultural and linguistic setting. In both the Fall and Spring semesters, interns may achieve 1.5 credits per semester for 10 hours of practical involvement per week. Normally internships are restricted to students in their third or fourth year of studies. Summer internships in foreign contexts are encouraged [3 credits].

RELS 437 Comparative Religions and Cults [F 2017/2019]  3 sem. hrs.
This course explores the beliefs and practices of some of the non-Christian religions of the world. Christian views are compared with other perspectives in order to provide a better understanding and knowledge of other faiths. In addition to considering other belief systems, we will discover ways of sharing Biblical truth with people who according to the Bible are blind, deceived, or idolatrous. Also, some of the major cults will be considered in order to describe their tenets, practices, and proselytizing methods. This course endeavours to provide the basic tools required to interact with people of other faiths.

RELS 438 Special Topics in Missions [F 2018/2020]  3 sem. hrs.
This course deals with matters that affect contemporary missiological practice. The major part of the course covers a variety of trends, issues, and subjects that are relevant to a missionary's tasks. Another part of the course focuses on matters pertaining to the contextualization of the gospel message across diverse cultures. Biblical content is applied to aspects of cultural analysis and the need to contextualize the gospel in diverse socio-cultural environments.

RELS 438: Special Topics: Community Development in Global Contexts [S 2017; TBA]  3 sem. hrs.
This course explores principles of International community development and draws upon the expertise of multiple organizations. Key areas of study include the evolution of development theory, as well as factors underlying poverty and injustice, conflict and displacement, dependency, paternalism and sustainability. Students will critically evaluate root causes of poverty and marginalization through a biblical lens and consider what solutions may exist. Lectures will address issues in disciplines including economics, politics, religion, history, and anthropology.

RELS 438: Special Topics: Ministry to Muslims [TBA]  3 sem. hrs.
An introductory overview of Islam, including its historical background, development, core beliefs and global appeal. The main doctrines and practices of Muslims are compared with Christian views. Practical guidelines for an effective, contextualized witness and service to Muslims are explored.

3.3 YOUTH LEADERSHIP (RELS)

RELS 232 Contemporary Youth Issues [S]  3 sem. hrs.
This course studies major current issues facing Canadian and American youth. Issues to be discussed include self-acceptance, peer pressure, relationships with parents, friendships, dating, sex, eating disorders, substance abuse, fashion and music.

COUN 245 Foundations of Counselling I [F]  3 sem. hrs.
This foundational course will provide students with an overview of Christian counselling. Focus will be on the role of the Christian worker in dealing with specific needs in their own congregation and community. Basic counselling methodologies as well as the student's personal growth will be emphasized.

RELS 334 Leadership Development [F]  3 sem. hrs.
Drawing from Biblical, theological, and social science sources this course constructs a theology of leadership development that will inspire ministry for the people of God. A primary focus of the course is to equip and mobilize individuals to build a vital faith community through small groups. Various approaches to small groups will be explored, including Bible studies, accountability groups, support groups, ministry teams and house churches. Topics include leadership recruitment and coaching, curriculum development, life cycles, problem people, multiplication, organizational structure and evaluation.

RELS 338 Local Church Leadership & Administration [F]  3 sem. hrs.
A study of church administration and the leadership issues involved in church ministry. Topics include church facilities, building projects, architecture, financing, promotion, meetings and parliamentary law. Students will practice and use the principles of established parliamentary procedure for the chairing of effective meetings. Required for all graduating students seeking ministerial credentials. (Note: for those in the B.R.E. Program, assignments will be geared to their major.)

and RELS 432 Career Youth Leadership [F]  3 sem. hrs.
This course studies vocational youth work. It discusses working philosophies, annual planning strategies, use of media and ongoing professional development. It also focuses on mobilizing youth, relationships with parents, volunteers, sponsors, and church staff in the context of living and ministering in the multicultural society of Canada. The youth leader's understanding of cultural identity is emphasized. The course also trains students to organize and lead youth on short-term mission experiences. (Prerequisites: RELS 233 Youth Leadership and RELS 232 Contemporary Youth Issues).

RELS 435, 436y Youth Leadership Internship
1-3 sem. hrs.
An organized program for participation in youth ministry activities under the supervision of an experienced youth pastor. In addition to youth ministry activities, students meet with the youth ministry director for one hour on alternate weeks in a practical work seminar. In both the Fall and Spring semesters, interns may achieve 1.5 credits per semester for 10 hours of practical involvement per week. Normally internships are restricted to students in their third or fourth year of studies.

3.4 CHRISTIAN EDUCATION (EDUC)

EDUC 142 Principles of Teaching [S]  3 sem. hrs.
An initial orientation to the field of Christian education. Since Christian education is vitally related to both the ministry of the church and the life of the individual Christian it must be built upon solid foundations. Biblical, theological, historical, sociological, philosophical, psychological and structural foundations of the educational ministry of the local church are studied. (Prerequisite to all other Christian education courses.)

EDUC 241 Youth Communication [F]  3 sem. hrs.
This course is a detailed study of the technical aspects of oral communication. It seeks to equip the student with specific knowledge, skills, and practice in the preparation and presentation of messages. The SCORRE method of preparation will be foundational in this process. Students also learn about the distinctives of speaking and preaching to contemporary North American youth. Opportunity is given for one general oral presentation, and two specific preaching presentations. This course is a prerequisite for RELS 234 Expository Preaching.

EDUC 243 Resource and Program Development [Q]  3 sem. hrs.
A course designed to equip the student to assess the educational needs of a modern church and then to develop a strategy to meet those needs. Emphasis will be placed on surveying resources and on developing a viable educational program for the church.

EDUC 244 Adolescent Development [S 2019/2021]  3 sem. hrs.
This course studies the development, characteristics, special needs and aspirations of adolescents. It places special emphasis on the physical, social, emotional, moral and spiritual maturation of youth. It also discusses the principles involved in assisting youth to develop maturity in these areas.

EDUC 341 Ministry to Children [S 2019/2021]  3 sem. hrs.
A study of the child and pre-adolescent from birth through age twelve. Attention is given to age-group characteristics, methods, and objectives in working with children in the church. Emphasis is given to students having practical involvement in observing children in a learning setting and leading or teaching children. Concurrent or previous enrolment in Church Ministries internship is recommended.

EDUC 342 Ministry to Adults [S 2018/2020]  3 sem. hrs.
A study of the objectives, organization and functions of a balanced program of religious education for the Christian adult. The teaching ministry of the church is appraised in the light of its responsibility to nurture believers that they may be stable and effective Christians. Concurrent or previous enrolment in Church Ministries Internship is recommended.

EDUC 441 Special Topics in Christian Education [Q]  3 sem. hrs.
Selected special topics in the area of Christian Education such as abuse, AIDS, handicapped/ special needs, hyperactive students, etc.

EDUC 442 Children's Outreach Ministry [Q]
1 sem. hrs.
A practical experience in the basic areas of children's ministry. This course provides training in puppetry, drama, music, storytelling and preaching to achieve an effective ministry to children. It seeks to prepare and involve a team of students in practical children's ministry.

EDUC 445, 446 Church Ministries Internship
1-3 sem. hrs.
An organized program for participation in missionary, youth, music, institutional or religious education activities, students meet for one hour per week in a practical work seminar. Participation in the church ministries practicum is required for all students in the two and three-year Christian education programs for two semesters and in the four-year for three semesters. Normally internships are restricted to students in their third or fourth year of studies.

EDUC 445, 446s Church Ministries Internship [Summer]
1-3 sem. hrs.
A program for those engaged in suitable summer ministries as listed in 456, 457 and 458 Church Ministries Practicum. It is expected that the program will be two months in duration.

3.5 COUNSELLING FOUNDATIONS (COUN/PSYC)

PSYC 106 Introduction to Psychology [TWU] [F]  3 sem. hrs.
This course provides a broad introduction to the field of psychology as a science. The practical, life-oriented application of scientific principles of psychology is explored. As well, development, learning, biological bases of behavior, motivation and emotion, perception, measurement and fundamental statistics, personality, behavioral and mental disorders, group and social processes are touched on.

COUN 245 Foundations of Counselling I [F]  3 sem. hrs.
This foundational course will provide students with an overview of Christian counselling. Focus will be on the role of the Christian worker in dealing with specific needs in their own congregation and community. Basic counselling methodologies as well as the student's personal growth will be emphasized.

COUN 246 Foundations of Counselling II [S]  3 sem. hrs.
Following Counselling Foundations I, this course will continue to study the foundational principles and basic skills of counselling. It delves into some self-reflection, with the understanding that knowing ourselves well and working through our own issues enables us to facilitate help in the lives of others. This course sets the groundwork to assist the student in establishing their own philosophy of counselling, one that will be worked on throughout their studies and completed in their final year.

PSYC 242 Developmental Psychology [S 2018/2020]  3 sem. hrs.
This course will study human development from infancy to old age, with attention given to the key physical, intellectual, emotional, moral and social characteristics of each developmental stage. Students will gain a working understanding of human development as the course investigates the impact of family, community, society and church influences in ones life. Throughout this course students will be challenged in their own personal reflection and understanding in order that they would gain a better understanding of self and others.

PSYC 343 Abnormal Psychology [F 2018/2020]  3 sem. hrs.
This course will study several psychological difficulties that present special problems in understanding and treatment. Stemming from a Biblical foundation, students will develop an understanding of such issues as eating disorders, sexual issues, personality disorders, anxiety, depression, codependency, addictions, etc. Attention will be given to etiology, symptoms, treatment, and community resources.

PSYC 344 Marriage and Family Counselling [S]  3 sem. hrs.
A study of premarital, marital and family issues with an emphasis on counselling within the family system. The course teaches the basic skills that will guide the student in counselling premarital, marital and family related concerns.

PSYC 440 Introduction to Addictions Counselling [TBA]
3sem. hrs.
This course provides an overview of current key concepts and models in the field of substance and behavioural/process addictions applying the bio-psycho-social-spiritual model. Students will be able to identify existing barriers to accessing help and gain understanding of the nature of mood-altering substances and the impact of behavioural addictions such as gambling, and shopping. Attention will be given to etiology, assessment and motivational interviewing skills in providing effective help to people with addiction difficulty.

PSYC 441 Counselling the Abused [Q]  3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to study the various types of abuse, including sexual, physical, emotional spousal, and ritual abuse. Special emphasis will be given to the counselling issues relevant to adults who were abused as children.

PSYC 443 Personality Theories [F 2018/2020]  3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to give a broad introduction to theory and research in the area of personality psychology. The course will cover a variety of personality theories such as psychodynamic, humanistic and existential, dispositional and learning theories. Personality theories will be taught in such a manner that students will develop an understanding of how such theories relate to them personally and be able to apply them to both their understanding of self and of others.

PSYC 444 Crisis Intervention and Conflict Management [F 2017/2019]  3 sem. hrs.
The course will focus on interventions for dealing with adults in specific crisis situations. Special emphasis will be given to the time limited nature of crisis intervention, legal, and ethical issues. Tools will be provided to network successfully with established community agencies.

PSYC 445 Statistics and Social Science [S 2018/2020]  3 sem. hrs.
This course introduces basic statistical concepts and methods, with emphasis on sound understanding and quantitative problem-solving and decision-making. Coverage includes: descriptive statistics, probability, normal distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and bivariate analysis (including correlation and regression). Special topics include: surveys, random sampling, sample size, reliability and validity, questionnaire design, non-parametric tests, and 'how to lie with statistics'. Practical examples of statistics will be drawn from everyday life, especially from social science (psychology & behavioural research).

COUN 445, 446 Counselling Internship  3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to provide counselling foundations majors with practical experience in a counselling profession under the supervision of an experienced counsellor or minister. It will allow students to choose from a variety of counselling related professions both in and out of a church context, in order that students will receive a well-rounded education and insight into counselling areas in which they may wish to specialize in the future.

PSYC 447 Brain and Behaviour [S]  3 sem. hrs.
This course will provide an introduction to the function of the human brain as it relates to human behaviour. Students will learn about major brain structures, systems, and the associated functions. The course will also look briefly at various brain disorders and difficulties that arise when brain functioning is not at its optimum. Time will also be spent to understand chemical influences and outcomes on brain and behaviour functioning.

3.6 MUSIC LEADERSHIP (MUSI)

Music Leadership Major: Two and Four-Year Programs
Students seeking a four-year Music Leadership Major degree should have some musical knowledge, skill and background in performance, as well as a desire to develop these within the framework and guidance of the music curriculum at Summit. Students lacking a music background should enter the two-year Music Leadership certificate program. Upon completion of the certificate program, students may apply for admission into the four-year degree program.

In order for students to develop their musicianship, they are encouraged to add additional private lessons, chapel group participation, graduation choir/band, and as many music elective courses to their schedules, as possible. Private lessons are available for piano, guitar, drums, and voice. These are optional beyond the required credits, but greatly encouraged for developing personal skill to the highest possible level and meeting core objectives in the program.

MUSI 002 Primary Instrument Competency -   0 sem. hrs. (pass/fail)
Music majors enrolled in the four-year degree program should become competent on a primary instrument and are encouraged to take lessons accordingly. The primary instrument should be either piano/keyboard OR guitar, in order to effectively give leadership to, and coach, church musicians. Voice training is also highly encouraged for skilful leading of corporate worship

MUSI 150 Graduation Choir/Band [S]  .5 sem. hr.
A non-auditioned music team consisting of all students who desire to be involved. The choir/band prepares for music ministry at the graduation ceremony in April and meets for one hour each week in the spring semester. May be repeated.

MUSI 151 Musicianship I [F]  3 sem. hrs.
A foundational course for music students to learn the concepts and skills needed to understand, read, create and perform contemporary music, individually or in a team setting. Theoretical concepts include: basic music and song elements; music terminology; staff notation; time signatures; key signatures; relative keys; scales; intervals; triads and inversions; and primary chords. Training in practical aural skills include: musical memory; ear training; identifying time signatures, scales, intervals, triads and primary chords; sight-singing; clapping and counting rhythms; singing scales, intervals and triads; dictation and transcription; and playing primary chords on the piano.
(This course is a prerequisite for MUSI 152 Musicianship II.)

MUSI 152 Musicianship II [S]  3 sem. hrs.
This course will expand on the theoretical and practical content taught in Musicianship I. Additional theoretical concepts and their corresponding aural skills, include: parallel keys; secondary chords; other chords (2,4,6,7,9,11,13,sus); chord symbols; slash chords; chord analysis; chord substitutions; cadences; duplets and triplets; hybrid meters; rest groupings; transposition; melody writing; two-, three-, and four-part writing; lead sheets and chord charts.
(This course is a prerequisite for MUSI 251/252 Keyboard I & II, and MUSI 352 Song Writing and Arranging. Prerequisite: MUSI 151)

MUSI 153, 154 Private Lessons  1, 1.5 or 2 sem. hrs.
Individual instruction in piano/keyboard, voice, guitar/bass, drums, or other instruments as instructors are available. Open to students of all programs. No previous instruction is necessary. Beginning lessons are 1/2 hour per week (1 sem. hr.), intermediate lessons are 3/4 hour per week (1.5 sem. hr.), and advanced lessons are 1 hour per week (2 sem. hr.).

Music majors in the degree program must enrol in private lessons on one instrument (either piano or guitar) for a minimum of 3 credit hours over the course of at least 3 semesters. At the conclusion of each semester, all Music majors taking private lessons will perform a practical examination worth 25% of the private lesson grade. This is the equivalent of a final exam in a course. Students must prepare two songs for their examination under the guidance of their instructor.

Music Leadership majors in the degree program must enrol in private lessons on one instrument (either piano or guitar) for a minimum of 3 credit hours over the course of at least 3 semesters. At the conclusion of each semester, all Music majors taking private lessons will perform a practical examination worth 25% of the private lesson grade. This is the equivalent of a final exam in a course. Students must prepare two songs for their examination under the guidance of their instructor.

MUSI 159, 160 Chapel Sound & Media Practicum I & II [F/S]  1 - 1 sem. hrs.
These practicums provide hands-on experience with live sound, recording and streaming, visual-media, and lighting equipment during chapels, college events, and recording projects.

BIBL 250 Biblical Foundations & Contemporary Issues of Worship [S 2017/2019]  3 sem. hrs.
This course develops a Biblical-Historical theology of worship in order to best navigate contemporary worship issues that face today's church. Scriptures are examined to discover the meaning of worship for both a personal devotional life and worship in a Christian community. The historical development of Christian worship is presented using Historical Paradigm Theory. Some of the contemporary issues that will be discussed are: song selection that serves the entire congregation, a healthy model for the arts and media in worship ministry, and differing perspectives in corporate worship service design - Seeker Service, Believers Service, or Missional Service. (This course is a prerequisite for MUSI 351 Corporate Worship Leadership and Administration.)

MUSI 251 Keyboard I [F]  1 sem. hrs.
One-on-one instruction for music students who intend to lead a church music team and/or play electric keyboard in a church band. Theoretical concepts learned will include: knowing the primary and secondary chords in all major and minor keys up to and including 4 sharps and 4 flats; and, knowing the V7 chord (key change chord) for all major and minor keys. Practical skills learned will include: chords and harmony technique; reading lead sheets and chord charts; chording by ear in basic keys; and playing in a fluent manner. Those with prior piano training should aim to reach Competency Level I. Those with no prior piano training should aim to reach Competency Level II. (This course is a prerequisite for MUSI 252 Keyboard II. Prerequisites: MUSI 151 & 152 Musicianship I & II).

MUSI 252 Keyboard II [S]  1 sem. hrs.
A class for music students who have completed MUSI 251 Keyboard I. Content will include: understanding the role of the keyboardist in a church team/band; knowing the pros and cons of using lead sheets and chord charts; accompanying vocalists; and learning the settings on the keyboard. The areas of focus will be on playing techniques for various sounds used in modern corporate worship, synthesis and sound creation, using software and soft-synths to generate sounds and play backing tracks. (Prerequisites: MUSI 151 & 152 Musicianship I & II; MUSI 251 Keyboard I).

MUSI 253 Instrumental Methods for Team Coaching [F 2017/S 2019]  2 sem. hr.
A practical course for music leaders to develop basic instrumental and coaching skills for church music teams. For church rhythm section instruments (i.e. drums, guitars, piano/keyboards) and orchestral instruments (i.e. woodwinds, brass, percussion, strings), the student will learn the basic relevant terminology, parts and accessories, placement, methods, ranges, tonal qualities, notation/scoring, and performance of each instrument, as well as being able to diagnose problems. (This course is a prerequisite for MUSI 351 Song-writing and Arranging.)

MUSI 254 Vocal Methods for Leading and Coaching [S 2017 Q]  1 sem. hr.
A practical course for music leaders to develop basic vocal competency and the ability to coach other vocalists in church music teams. Students will study the principles of good vocal production, for singing, acting and speaking. The course includes instruction in proper posture, effective breath support and control, listening, projection, resonation, diction, song interpretation, expression and performance. Students will also learn how to detect vocal weaknesses in other vocalists in order to coach them for improvement. Recommended as a prerequisite for private voice lessons.

MUSI 351 Corporate Worship Leadership and Administration [S 2019/2021]  3 sem. hrs.
This course presupposes a firm grasp of the theoretical and practical content taught in BIBL 250 Biblical Theology of Worship. A brief review of the Biblical purposes of the church, corporate gatherings and the use of the arts, will be followed by the practical aspects of giving leadership and administrating the corporate worship arts and ministries of the local church. Focused consideration will be given to developing skills in planning, preparing for and leading congregational gatherings. Students will observe, evaluate and learn from corporate worship ministries (rehearsals, services, sessions with leaders) in a variety of churches. Spiritual, pastoral, cultural, musical, and technological considerations will be discussed. Administrative duties such as scheduling, accessing resources, training and mentoring, working with a church leadership team and organizing events will be discussed. (Prerequisite: BIBL 250 Biblical Theology of Worship).

MUSI 352 Song Writing and Arranging [S 2018/2020]  3 sem. hrs.
This course briefly outlines the characteristics of a variety of musical genres. It also offers foundational skills for composing and arranging songs for music ministry in and outside of the church. Aspects include a song's purpose, context, form, lyrics, melody, rhythm, harmony, dynamics, style, instrumentation, arrangement and scoring. An investigation of computer resources including notation and sequencing programs will be included. (Prerequisite: MUSI 253 Instrumental Methods for Team Coaching).

MUSI 353, 354 Chapel Ministry Group [F/S]  1-1sem. hrs.
Students enrolled in both the Music certificate and degree programs are required to complete a minimum of 2 semester hours credit in Chapel Ministry teams. This includes mentorship by the designated Chapel Teams Mentor for skill enhancement, review and planning. Degree students are encouraged to be involved in these teams beyond the required semester hours in order to develop skill in this ministry.

MUSI 353r, 354r Rejoice [F/S]  1-1sem. hrs.
A group of singers and instrumentalists who are chosen each fall by audition to minister in BC and Yukon District PAOC churches and at college functions. Open to students of all programs (except Omega). Members are expected to enroll for a full academic year and must maintain a minimum 2.3 grade point average and good citizenship. Class meets 2 hours per week. May be repeated.

MUSI 355 Church Audio and Media [F]   2 sem. hrs.
A practical seminar course including training in live sound production, stage lighting, video / audio recording, streaming, projection and related computer programs, plus the use of social media for church ministry.

MUSI 356 Recording and Mixing I [F]  2 sem. Hrs.
This course introduces the student to some of the most popular Digital Audio Workstations (DAW) for studio recording and mixing and live performance. It explains the entire production process from initial song demo to a final master using both Logic® and ProTools®. It will cover such topics as setting up a project studio, positioning microphones to capture superior sounds, recording and editing techniques, running an effective and inspiring recording session, and basic mixing techniques. It will also introduce the student to running backing tracks for live music performance and worship services using Ableton Live®.

MUSI 357 Recording Studio Lab I [F]  1 sem. hrs.
This lab provides an opportunity for students to apply the concepts learned in MUSI 356 Recording and Mixing I to real world exercises and projects.

MUSI 358 Recording and Mixing II [S]  2 sem. hrs.
This course builds upon the recording and mixing techniques learned in MUSI 356 Recording and Mixing I and provides more advanced techniques in music production, recording, editing, mixing, and mastering.

MUSI 359 Recording Studio Lab II [S]  1 sem. hrs.
This lab provides an opportunity for students to apply the concepts learned in MUSI 358 Recording and Mixing II to real world exercises and projects.

MUSI 360 History of Music [DS]  3 sem. hrs.
An overview of the history of music in western culture. Emphasis is placed on the development of music and its diverse expressions in society and in the Christian Church from Biblical times to the present.

MUSI 361 Production in Ministry [S]  2 sem. hrs.
This course provides an introduction to production as a ministry in the local church. It explores the role of the production team within the creative ministry and expression of the church in worship and outreach. It develops a ministry philosophy that harnesses the power and possibilities of all dimensions of production in service to the church in worship and ministry.

MUSI 455, 456 Music Internship  3 sem. hrs.
A supervised program designed to give the student first-hand experience in church and pastoral ministry with particular focus on corporate worship, music and other arts ministries. It is expected that the intern will be involved in as many facets of church ministry as possible, under the supervision of an experienced pastor.
[Prerequisite: Junior status (4 semesters completed) in the Music degree program.] Although there is no examination for this course, there are required assignments to complete.

3.7 NOT FOR PROFIT ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP (NFPL)

NFPL 101- Introduction to Administrative Leadership [F]  3 sem. hrs.
This course considers some of the Biblical principles and perspectives concerning institutional administration work. An historical overview of administration in church and in nonprofit organization follows with a focus on mission statements, strategies, and principles. An analysis of several not for profit companies will present case studies of non-governmental, Christian mission agencies and a variety of charities. Some of the issues, trends, employment opportunities and challenges which affect this sector are explored.

BUSI 111 Business Foundations [S]  3 sem. hrs.
This course is an introductory study of business, particularly focusing on planning and budgeting of both personal and church finances, and on the organizing, managing and reporting of (church) business entities. Coverage includes business leadership, especially as applied to leading effective meetings and trouble-shooting various management issues/conflicts, along with a primer (fundamental principles) on how to start a small business.

RELS 334 Leadership Development [F]  3 sem. hrs.
Building on biblical theology as well as secular leadership theory and practice, an integrated approach to developing leaders in the church and in ministry organizations will be considered. Several contemporary models of ministry and leadership development will be discussed and evaluated, with an emphasis on holistic small groups as a method of developing leaders. Practical methods of identifying, recruiting, training, empowering and evaluating leaders will be explored. Models of organizational leadership and characteristics of successful leadership are considered.

NFPL 202- Organizational Planning [S]  3 sem. hrs.
The fundamentals of strategic management, planning and development are considered. The importance of the mission statement, ministry vision and values are considered for the development of organizational objectives. The role of organizational leadership, culture, governance, resource acquisition and ethical considerations are discussed. Board governance models, roles and stakeholder responsibilities are surveyed. Long and short term planning, research and assessment principles used in the non-profit sector are studied.

NFPL 301- Fund Development & Financial Management [F]  3 sem. hrs.
Financial management requirements in not-for-profit organizations are often complex and demanding. In this course, students are introduced to major systems and concepts, and related best-practices, of not-for-profit financial management. Topics addressed include organizational budgeting and accounting, revenue generation, controls, compliance related to pertinent CRA legislation, and the management of accountabilities to diverse revenue sources. Learners practice core skills and concepts essential for senior not-for-profit leaders including communication issues, partnerships, alliances, and marketing procedures. The principles, ethics, and practices of professional fundraising are explored. A systematic process of preparation for raising finances is developed. Case studies of effective fundraising in the North American context are discussed. The mission and vision of organizations are examined in relation to areas which include relationships to Major Donors, Philanthropy in general, Planned Giving programs and Christian Stewardship considerations. Elements of proposal and grant writing will be considered to discuss purpose and responsibility, organizational readiness, research, mechanics of preparation, development of a formal proposal/grant, presentation, followup, and post grant reporting..

NFPL 302- Human Resource Management [S]  3 sem. hrs.
Institutional personnel include board members, management, staff, and volunteers. Leadership is responsible for aspects of recruitment, hiring, training, developing, motivating, compensating and managing all personnel working for the organization. Human resources policies, principles, and procedures are examined for best practices. Due to the high number of potential volunteers in church and not for profit organizations, the elements of an effective volunteer program are determined.

NFPL 401- Capstone Project  3 sem. hrs.
This project involves the student's implementation of program principles for the strategic planning and initiation of a not for profit organization under the mentorship of leaders in the sector. The student will be posted to an institution for work and the application of principles learned.

NFPL 402- Business as Mission [S]  3 sem. hrs.
This course explores a broad range of issues related to the entrepreneurial elements of not for profit organizations in order to prepare for the implementation of services which address current needs in various communities. Factors in the formation of an executable business plan are explored. Students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to create new programs and initiatives in a non-profit organization by creating a plan for a new program from the research stage through evaluation. This course analyses elements of social change which affect business and growth concepts. Hybrid models and available technology are explored.

RELS 335, 336, 435, 436 Pastoral Ministry Internship  1-3 sem. hrs.
An organized program for participation in Christian service activities under the supervision of an experienced pastor in a local assembly. In addition to church activities, students meet for one hour on alternate weeks in a practical work seminar. In both the Fall and Spring semesters interns may achieve 1.5 credits per semester for 10 hours of practical involvement per week. Normally internships are restricted to students in their third or fourth year of studies.

4. DIVISION OF GENERAL EDUCATION

SPC offers a variety of General Education courses. The purpose of integrating Biblical and General studies is to provide a clear Biblical worldview which prepares a student for dynamic engagement with society. This encompasses a diversity of subjects and disciplines that work together to develop analytical, critical, and communicative skills for ministry.

The core courses in English, Philosophy, History and Social Sciences are taught by Trinity Western University [TWU; see next page]. Additionally, a number of other courses that qualify as general education are taught by SPC. Approximately 24 courses in the curriculum at SPC is course work that is general in nature and covers a number of disciplines in the main classifications of Communication, Humanities and Fine Arts, Natural Science, and Social/Behavioural Sciences.

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE OBJECTIVES

It is anticipated that SPC students who take general education courses will:

  1. develop their reading skills to critically examine texts, genres, and grammar.
  2. increase writing abilities by improving grammar usage, sentence structure, punctuation, and composition.
  3. grasp general historical information, eras, and developments in human civilization.
  4. develop skills for interviewing, researching and composing historical, biographical information.
  5. increase knowledge and appreciation of a Christian worldview.
  6. develop critical thinking skills in philosophy and the social sciences.
  7. enhance the formation of Christian moral standards and the ability to apply principles to individual, local, and global issues in an ethical manner.
  8. understand the nature of human development and sociological conditions.
  9. apply inductive and deductive reasoning to discover scientific principles and concepts.
  10. integrate Biblical and theological information with secular disciplines of learning.

Each course covers a broad core of content but some general studies disciplines are extended to a second and third level. Courses that may qualify for General Studies are:

COMMUNICATION

  • RELS 236 Intercultural Communication
  • WRTG 100 Writing in the University Context [TWU]

FINE ARTS

  • MUSI 452 History of Music

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

  • GREE 234/36 Elementary NT Greek
  • HEBR 245/46 Elementary Biblical Hebrew & Exegesis

HISTORY

  • HIST 111 History of Western Civilization [TWU]
  • HIST 172 History of the Pentecostal Church
  • HIST 260 History of Christianity [TWU]
  • HIST 462 History of the Ancient Near East
  • BIBL 411 New Testament Backgrounds

LITERATURE

  • ENGL 103 Introduction to Literature [TWU]

PHILOSOPHY

  • PHIL 105 Introduction to Philosophy [TWU]
  • PHIL 210 Contemporary Ethical Issues [TWU]
  • RELS 437 Comparative Religions and Cults

NATURAL SCIENCES

  • SCIE 478 Natural Science Survey
  • PSYC 445 Statistics & Social Sciences

SOCIAL SCIENCES

  • SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology [TWU]
  • PSYC 106 Introduction to Psychology [TWU]
  • PSYC 242 Developmental Psychology
  • RELS 332 Christianity and Culture
  • PSYC 344 Marriage and Family

HIST 172 History of the Pentecostal Church in Canada [S]  3 sem. hrs.
This course studies the growth of the Pentecostal Movement, particularly in Canada. It will introduce the movement in its broader context within the Protestant church, and will focus upon leaders, churches, movements, and theological issues which have impacted the Canadian context over the last 90 years.

RELS 236 Intercultural Communication [S]  3 sem. hrs.
This course is an introduction to matters of intercultural communication. It helps us to identify our own cultural perspectives and facilitates learning about interpersonal relationships with people of other cultures. Various principles and tools for communicating the gospel to people in a different environment from our own familiar culture are considered. Cultural attitudes, values, and ways of life are presented and compared. Important issues like communication skills, culture, reaching people within a different context, diverse ways of thinking and expressing, and variegated behaviour patterns will be discussed.

PSYC 242 Developmental Psychology [S]  3 sem. hrs.
This course will study human development from infancy to old age, with attention given to the key physical, intellectual, emotional, moral and social characteristics of each developmental stage. Students will gain a working understanding of human development as the course investigates the impact of family, community, society and church influences in ones life. Throughout this course students will be challenged in their own personal reflection and understanding in order that they would gain a better understanding of self and others.

RELS 332 Christianity and Culture [S]  3 sem. hrs.
A study of the place of Christianity in the secular, multicultural, "post-modern" world of North America. This course discusses the contemporary North American culture and general worldview. It explores dimensions of this culture that Christians should repudiate, and aspects Christians should affirm. This course examines how the entertainment media, fashion industry, sports, and news media, function as the cultural conditioners of our society and seeks to affirm a positive Christian worldview.

COUN 344 Marriage and Family Counselling [S]  3 sem. hrs.
A study of premarital, marital and family issues with an emphasis on counselling within the family system. The course teaches the basic skills that will guide the student in counselling premarital, marital and family related concerns.

MUSI 360 History of Music [DS]  3 sem. hrs.
An overview of the history of music in western culture. Emphasis is placed on the development of music and its diverse expressions in society and in the Christian Church from Biblical times to the present.

RELS 437 Comparative Religions and Cults [F 2017/2019]  3 sem. hrs.
This course explores the beliefs and practices of some of the non-Christian religions of the world. Christian views are compared with other perspectives in order to provide a better understanding and knowledge of other faiths. In addition to considering other belief systems, we will discover ways of sharing biblical truth with people who according to the Bible are blind, deceived, or idolatrous. Also, some of the major cults will be considered in order to describe their tenets, practices, and proselytizing methods. This course endeavours to provide the basic tools required to interact with people of other faiths.

PSYC 445 Statistics & Social Science [S 2018/2020]  3 sem. hrs.
This course introduces statistical concepts and methods, with emphasis on sound understanding and quantitative problem-solving and decision-making. Coverage includes: descriptive statistics, probability, normal distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing and bivariate analysis (including correlation and regression). Special topics include: surveys, random sampling, sample size, reliability and validity, questionnaire design, non-parametric tests, and 'how to lie with statistics'. Practical examples of statistics will be drawn from everyday life, especially from social science (psychology & behavioural research).

SCIE 447 Natural Science Survey [S 2018/2020]  3 sem. hrs.
This study of the natural sciences spans topics and disciplines of life sciences (such as biology, genetics, biochemistry, homology, anthropology), earth sciences (geology, paleontology, geophysics, hydrology, meteorology), astronomical and physical sciences (astronomy, cosmology, thermodynamics, chemistry, physics). Coverage introduces basic concepts and ideas that govern the principles of the natural world and provides a new way of thinking about the physical environment. Students will learn how science works, how scientists approach problems, and why science is constantly adapting in its search for understanding

HIST 462 History of the Ancient Near East [S 2019/2021]  3 sem. hrs.
This course is a study of the main civilizations of the Near East, including Canaan, Egypt, Mesopotamia and Persia. Historic developments from the invention of writing to the conquest of Alexander of Macedon in 332 B.C. are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the political, cultural and religious history of the Near East and its influence on the people of Israel.

5. TRINITY WESTERN UNIVERSITY

The following General Education courses in the humanities and social sciences are taught at Summit's campus by Trinity Western University. The student who takes these 8 university courses will receive a separate Certificate and transcript from TWU.

WRTG 100 Writing in the University Context [F]  3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed to improve the reading, writing, and critical thinking skills of students whose first language is English. Students are required to read an array of essays, discuss them critically, and write papers analyzing the structure and content of these essays.

ENGL 103 Introduction to Literature: Short Fiction & Poetry [S]  3 sem. hrs.
This course will engage students in the critical and analytical study of short fiction and poetry with a view to increasing students' understanding and enjoyment of literary works. Students will also study the art of effective written communication through a number of short essays.

HIST 111 History of Western Civilization [F]  3 sem. hrs.
A survey of civilization beginning with ancient Greece and ending with its modern expression in the Western world. Topics include the development and decline of democracies, relationships between the poor and the wealthy, between men and women, changes in the nature of the family, and the resolution of social tensions and conflict.

HIST 260 History of Christianity [S]  3 sem. hrs.
The course surveys the experience, thought and achievements of significant individuals and movements from the Reformation period to the present. Classes will be devoted mainly to lecture, discussion of assigned readings from Bettenson, and discussions surrounding the implications of readings and course lectures. [Prerequisite: HIST 111 or 112]

PHIL 105 Introduction to Philosophy [F]  3 sem. hrs.
This course is designed both to sharpen thinking skills and to introduce students to questions addressed by philosophers. These will include: the relationship between perception and knowledge (appearance and reality), the existence and nature of God, human freedom and determinism, the meaning of human existence, the nature of moral judgements, the mind/body problem, artificial intelligence, feminist philosophy, the problem of suffering, and whether humans are capable of selfless motivation.

PHIL 210 Contemporary Ethical Issues [S]  3 sem. hrs.
This course examines some current moral questions including abortion, euthanasia, animal rights, environmental ethics, sexual morality, responsibility to distant peoples, genetic engineering, fetal implants, and organ transplants. Emphasis will be on clarifying the issues, exploring various views on them and their supporting arguments, and exposing important underlying assumptions. Prerequisite: PHIL 105

PSYC 106 Introduction to Psychology [F]  3 sem. hrs.
A broad introduction to the field of psychology as a science. The practical, life-oriented application of scientific principles of psychology. Development, learning, biological bases of behaviour, motivation and emotion, perception, measurement and fundamental statistics, personality, behavioural disorders and mental health, group and social processes.

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology [S]  3 sem. hrs.
An introduction to culture, socialization, social structures and organization, group and institutional behaviour, and human ecology. Social interaction and deviancy in relation to social change and social movements. Specific topics of role, social control, class and mobility, and social power are included.

6. SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES

BIBE 501 - Contemporary and Pentecostal Approaches to Biblical Texts
This advanced hermeneutics course focuses on three areas. It begins with a brief discussion of the discipline itself and basic exegetical steps for sound interpretation of the Scripture before moving to discussion about contemporary issues in hermeneutics such as theological and philosophical challenges. The discussion also includes the overview of the classic methodologies, such as the historical-grammatical method and form and redaction criticism, before moving on to modern hermeneutical approaches.

Secondly, the course presents new research and interpretative methodologies that have transformed classical biblical studies and the view of "text" and "reader" over the last thirty years, focusing on disciplines such as rhetorical, canonical and new literary criticisms, postmodern approaches such as reader-response and resistant readings, structuralist and deconstructive readings as well as social-scientific and socio-rhetorical criticisms. The final part of the course discusses Pentecostal issues in biblical hermeneutics, especially the role of the Holy Spirit in the interpretative process, and current trends in Pentecostal hermeneutics of community.

THEO 502 - Pentecostal Pastoral Theology
This course deals with the theology and methodology of pastoral formation distinctively suitable to the pastoral ministry in the context of Pentecostal churches. The goal is to help to shape the student into an effective, ethical, Biblical pastor - a pastoral team member and a leader who can develop spiritual formation and leadership abilities in others. The course seeks to immerse the student in Biblical principles of pastoral ministry and allows the student to reflect upon those principles in the professional ministry within contemporary culture.

THEO 503 - Pentecostal Distinctives
This course traces the beginnings and origins of Pentecostalism within the Protestant and Evangelical traditions, and the development of the movement during the twentieth century into a major force in world Christianity and its contemporary diversity. Although there are significant differences, Pentecostalism is seen here as a major branch of Evangelicalism. This course also deals with selected biblical passages, especially from the Lucan corpus, that are vital and important to Pentecostal Theology and praxis.

THEO 504 - Canadian Pentecostal History
This course is an in-depth study of the Pentecostal Movement in Canada. It concentrates on theological, sociological, phenomenological and denominational aspects of the movement in order to bring understanding not only to the movement's past but also its current state, as well as specific issues within the Canadian context.

THEO 505 - Pentecostal Preaching in Post-Christian Culture
This course on homiletics explores the specific challenges and opportunities for effective preaching in the western post-Christian culture. This course discusses how the post-Christian context impacts theology and the dynamics of communication. A central theme in the course addresses how 'narrative intelligence' and the use of imagination in sermon construction and delivery impact the ability of preaching to bring about spiritual transformation for today's listener. The course answers questions like, "How does imagination influence the delivery and reception of preaching?", "How can imagination and story energize sermon development?", and "What is Pentecostal narrative-imaginative preaching?" Various approaches to preaching are explored. The course includes both theoretical and practical elements, which offers the prospect of immediate application to one's preaching ministry.

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